Earthbound Artist

My Corona Garden

12 May, 2020 2 comments Leave a comment

Karen Richardson home and studio

My life has been impacted in many ways by the Covid19 global pandemic. During these last few months of isolation, it has been an interesting journey to design a 'new normal', while my husband and I hunker down at our home property, which is pictured above. In this article I am sharing with you a glimpse of how we have been spending our time at the homestead.

The biggest impact to our personal life was the cancellation of a 7-week vacation in Australia. My husband and I were to begin our excellent adventure in early April with a week touring Tasmania in our rented camper van and then fully explore the coastal route from Melbourne to Cairns before flying home at the end of May. Here is the type of adventure we had envisioned:

Gallivanting Oz Adventure in Australia 

Hopefully we can re-book the trip at a later date through the same company, Gallivanting Oz, who did an excellent job of arranging our camper van rental and subsequent cancellation and refund. If anyone is considering a similar holiday in future years, I highly recommend this awesome Australian company. We cancelled our first class flights with Air Canada but have not seen our refund or credit yet.

Karen Richardson gardens

Our life at home has gotten quiet, yet not boring. My husband is retired but his handyman hobby takes him to his shop out back (pictured above), fixing things for the house and doing vehicle maintenance. We order repair parts and supplies online or by phone (from local stores offering safe curbside pickup if possible) and I make a weekly trip to the grocery store. I'm doing more cooking and baking for us than I usually would and we are making the most of this chance to live life simply and deliciously.

Karen Richardson's baking

Since we live on the edge of a small town, there are lots of places where we can walk during the day for exercise without getting close to anyone. We don't have cable or satellite TV but enjoy spending our evenings watching educational videos on YouTube or programs on Netflix. I also enjoy reading most days. We have conversations with friends and family by phone or Facetime. I look forward to the day when we can resume our in-person walks, visits, and dinners with our longtime friends.

Karen Richardson studio

I'm an introvert by nature (as many artists are), so being told I have to stay home actually makes me happy. I have an infinite list of fun things to do in my home and art studio (pictured above). As is my usual habit, I spent the winter months creating lots of new paintings and then moved to outdoor mode once spring arrived. Shown below is the mound garden in our front yard, tidied up for the start of the growing season.

Karen Richardson garden

The fact that I don't have to go out for meetings, fitness classes or appointments, means I can decide how to fill each day based on the weather or how energetic I  feel. I find myself wondering how to change my habits going forward, so I can continue this simpler existence in a post-pandemic world.

My husband and I had planned to spend the summer of 2020 making short camping trips with our travel trailer to various regions of Ontario, after we returned from Australia. It remains to be seen whether those excursions will happen or not. The realization that we may have to stay home this spring and possibly summer lead us to research growing a vegetable garden.

The current upheaval of our food supply caused by the pandemic has prompted many people throughout the world to start a vegetable garden this year, just like the Victory gardens of the second world war. I think this activity gives people a sense of control in a time of uncertainty, makes us feel useful by growing our own food, and gets us out into the fresh air while safely spending time at home.

I have enjoyed establishing raised bed flower gardens at all three of our home properties over the years, but never had the time to devote to growing many edibles before this year. The photo below from 2013 shows some of the backyard flower gardens at our Port Perry home, which was on a one acre property.

Karen Richardson garden

We downsized to our lovely bungalow in Lindsay the following year. The raised border garden shown below was one I constructed shortly after our move, using stone dug up from our one acre yard. I grew pole beans and garlic successfully, but invasive grass runners from the adjacent farm field had started to invade my stone garden. This spring, I decided to dismantle it and try something more robust and permanent for my new vegetable garden.

Karen Richardson stone garden 

My husband and I designed wooden raised planters 18 inches tall with a top frame wide enough to sit on, to make gardening more comfortable for me, and to have high quality soil with fewer weeds.

He built the two cedar planters pictured below in his shop. These are each 4 feet wide by 8 feet long and have no bottoms. The little legs will keep them pinned to the ground and the planters are lined on the inside with builders' vapour barrier to help extend the durability of the wood. He also varnished the outside surfaces with clear Varathane wood preservative.

Karen Richardson garden planters

We moved the planters to a sunny spot in our yard in mid April, and since then I have been steadily filling them with a custom mix of soils and amendments using a sustainable agriculture technique called Hugelkultur (meaning 'hill culture' in German).

Hugelkultur mimics how plants grow in a natural forest ecosystem, where trees fall over onto the forest floor,  and other organic matter falls and accumulates on top of the fallen trees and breaks down. This creates a fertile place for the seeds of new plants to germinate and grow on top of the decaying wood and other organic materials. This environment not only provides extremely fertile soil for new plants, but the woody materials also soak up water like a sponge.

The photos below show the layers I used to fill my planters.

Karen Richardson garden planters   Karen Richardson garden planters  

First I covered the sod with cut up paper leaf bags. By the time they decompose over the next year, the grass will have died and will not invade the garden. Worms and other beneficial organisms will be able to travel between the ground and the raised beds. The second layer was wood from apple trees we cut down. The largest pieces went in the bottom, followed by all the cut up twigs. This wood layer will slowly rot, providing nutrients to the soil above and acting as a spongy layer to retain moisture.

Karen Richardson garden planters   Karen Richardson garden planters  

Next I covered the twigs and wood with layers of composted manure and native top soil (screened to remove gravel and weeds) that was cleared from our yard when my husband's shop was built.

Karen Richardson garden planters   Karen Richardson garden planters

I had saved garden clippings from the spring cleanup of my perennial beds and all those dried trimmings went on next. I covered that with about 8 inches of screened native topsoil mixed with peat moss and composted manure. Then I created a grid with string and aluminum plant markers, in preparation for my 'square foot gardening' planting layout. In this bed I am densely planting raspberry bushes, onions, carrots, lettuce, spinach, radishes, and marigolds (to deter pests).

Karen Richardson garden planters

The photo above shows my other raised planting bed which will have asparagus, pole beans, tomatoes, sweet peppers, lettuce, herbs, nasturtiums, and marigolds. You can see the bamboo teepees that will support future pole beans. The plastic bubble is a cloche, protecting herb seeds while they germinate. To the right of my planters is where the stone border garden used to sit, now seeded with grass.

I will post a garden update later in the season so you can see my progress. If you are growing a Corona garden this year, I hope you enjoy it and have good luck with your green thumb. Be well and safe.

If you have comments to share, please do so using the 'Leave a Comment' button at the top of this post. 

Subscribe to Karen's Newsletter if you wish to see more life-of-the-artist articles, travel tales, painting stories, studio news updates, or notices of upcoming painting classes and exhibitions.

The Making of 'One Shining Moment'

15 April, 2020 3 comments Leave a comment

One Shining Moment, watercolour by Karen Richardson

Since I paint in a realistic style, I use photographs as references for my watercolour scenes, so I can get the details right and make viewers feel like they could walk right into my paintings.

Although I occasionally use a photo taken by another photographer (with written permission as dictated by international copyright laws), the overwhelming majority of my painting references are my own photos.

The autumn scene pictured above, 'One Shining Moment', watercolour on panel (no glass) 14 x 22" was inspired by a photo I took while visiting our friends' cottage near Haliburton, Ontario.

The view from their shore is lovely in all seasons, looking out over the lake to a series of forested hills.This lake has inspired a handful of watercolour paintings over the years, including 'Winter Interrupted' (2001) 12 x 21", shown below.

Winter Interrupted, watercolour by Karen Richardson

Here is another watercolour shown below, 'Jennifer's Winter Wonderland' (2007) 10 x 7".

Jennifer's Winter Wonderland, watercolour by Karen Richardson

During another visit to this lake in September 2012, I managed to catch a moment of autumn sunlight highlighting the shoreline trees in the photo below. This 'spotlighting' effect creates a dramatic focal point, emphasized by diagonal lines of the treed slopes as well as dark shadows in behind, and underscored by gentle lake ripples from a faint breeze.

Photo by Karen Richardson  

Lighting makes the difference between a great photo and an ordinary one. Below is another shot taken at a different time that day. While lovely, it has no strong focal point. No single element grabs the viewer and says "Look at me! I'm magnificent!".

 Photo by Karen Richardson

For the last 8 years, the sunlit photo with the strong focal point has lingered in my vast photo reference collection, too daunting to try to capture in watercolour. Finally this spring I had time to tackle a major work, so I took the plunge and developed a large watercolour based on my autumn lake photo.

As I suspected, the sheer scale of the painting and the technical difficulties of masses of tree foliage and blurred reflections would make this a very difficult and time-consuming project. But I kept my nose to the grindstone for 3 weeks, working layer by layer with lots of patience, and prevailed.

I added a tiny red canoe to the sheltered little beach to give a sense of scale to the forest and to help viewers insert their own stories and memories into this scene.

Fortunately I had the foresight to take photos of each stage of this challenging painting as I worked. From these work-in-progress photos, I assembled a short time lapse video, so you can see the flow of this piece to its completion.

Click on the image below to view the 3-minute story:

I am very pleased with how this major work turned out. I feel like it is beckoning me to enter the scene and spend a perfect day exploring the mysteries of this beautiful northern lake. I hope you feel the same pull to become part of this magical place.

For more details about this painting, click here.

If you have comments you wish to share, please do so using the 'Leave a Comment' button at the top of this post. 

Subscribe to Karen's Newsletter to see more of her painting stories, travel tales, studio news updates, or notices of upcoming painting classes and exhibitions.

New Works: Magical Islands

25 March, 2020 2 comments Leave a comment

Watercolours by Karen Richardson

Northern lakes are the places in nature that heal the stress of my busy life, calm my mind, and restore my equilibrium. I love them beyond measure and cannot imagine a life that does not offer frequent immersion in these glorious landscapes throughout the year.

I pour my authentic soul into each and every painting I create of remarkable natural places. My hope is that you, the viewer, find a soothing resonance within your own true self when you gaze upon my artwork.

Every winter I enjoy several months of dedicated studio time. This post tells the creation stories of my latest northern lake paintings, all of which are small in size but abundant in optimism and joy.


A Piece of Heaven by Karen Richardson

Shown above is A Piece of Heaven, watercolour on panel (no glass) 6 x 12".

This piece was inspired by two photos taken years ago. I forget the locations but I think they were somewhere in Ontario. One was an early autumn photo and the other was was taken in summer, but they joined together to make an interesting composition (shown below).

Photo by Karen Richardson

I particularly liked the tiny sailboat near the island, and the faint reflections of the dark trees on choppy water. I decided to make my painting a later autumn scene. How lovely it would be to spend a breezy day sailing between the islands of this glorious place.

Click here for more details about A Piece of Heaven.

 

Shown above is Out of the Blue, watercolour on panel (no glass) 12 x 9". This piece is entirely from my imagination, based on years of visiting beautiful northern lakes and absorbing their peace and serenity.

I painted the sky and water first, building up a half dozen layers over the course of a week to get the depth of colour I needed. When that was fully dry I penciled in the island and two canoeists, then painted them. They are enjoying a peaceful paddle around the island, before the sun dissolves the early morning mist.

Click here for more details about Out of the Blue.

 


 

Shown above is Autumn Dream, watercolour on panel (no glass) 6 x 12". It is another piece painted entirely from my imagination. Originally it was a square 12 x 12" work in progress, but I overworked the reflections and decided to crop them out of the painting. I think this stretched format makes a stronger statement.

I especially love the clear autumn colours and variety of trees on the island, and the misty shores in the background. I included a canoe in the scene to add to the story. Someone is exploring this wee island. Maybe they camped here last night and are preparing for another glorious day on the lake.

Click here to see more details about Autumn Dream.

 

Autumn Adventure, watercolour by Karen Richardson

Shown above is Autumn Adventure, watercolour on panel (no glass) 8 x 8". I took the reference photo (pictured below) a few years ago on an ATV excursion in the Haliburton region of central Ontario.

Photo by Karen Richardson

It was easy to translate this photo into a square format. I changed the overcast day into a sunny one in my painting. I included the overhanging leaves to enhance the sense of shelter and protection. The viewer is exploring on a fine autumn day, peeking out from a tree-covered shoreline to discover this wee gem of an island. Let's hop in a kayak or canoe and paddle over there.

Click here for more details about Autumn Adventure.

 

Shown above is When All is Calm, watercolour on panel (no glass) 6 x 12". This scene was inspired by two photos I took somewhere in Ontario years ago (shown below).

Photos by Karen Richardson

I employed considerable artistic license when creating this painting. It captures a moment of serene calm - that rare early autumn day when the lake is like glass. We all could use some of this peace and solace these days.

Click here for more details about When All is Calm.

 

Shown above is The Golden Hour, watercolour on panel (no glass) 10 x 10". This is one of those paintings that started off as one thing and morphed into something completely different. It was like the painting knew what it wanted to be and nudged my brush strokes in that direction.

The original idea was inspired by two saltwater sunset photos (shown below) that I took near Twillingate when we visited Newfoundland last summer. I liked the golden tones in the first photo and planned to add the moored sailboat from the second photo. The story would involve sailors anchored for the night in a sheltered bay.

Photo of Hillgrade NL sunset by Karen Richardson   Photo Twillingate NL sunset by Karen Richardson

I decided on a square format and started painting the sky and its reflection. It took many layers over the course of a week to build up rich colour and contrast between the glow of the sun and the shadows surrounding it. Shown below are 3 stages of this layering process.

The Golden Hour watercolour in progress by Karen Richardson   The Golden Hour watercolour in progress by Karen Richardson   The Golden Hour watercolour in progress by Karen Richardson

The resulting bronze colour scheme was not the original coppery hue from the photo reference, and the highlights were more globular than streaky, but I really liked the soft, soothing mood that was emerging. I looked through my photo archives for a new water scene reference and found the perfect one (shown below).

Photo by Karen Richardson

I took this early morning photo decades ago at the old Richardson family cottage on Big Cedar Lake in central Ontario. I used the iconic raft and far shore as references to complete my painting and the story became a quiet moment in cottage country.

Click here for more details about The Golden Hour.

I hope you have enjoyed this behind-the-scenes look at my latest creations, and a glimpse into how I translate photos from my travels into unique artistic expressions. My hope is that my artwork will welcome viewers like old friends, and draw them into the narrative deeply embedded in each painting.

If you have comments you wish to share, please do so using the 'Leave a Comment' button at the top of this post. 

Subscribe to Karen's Newsletter if you wish to see more painting stories, travel tales, studio news updates, or notices of upcoming painting classes and exhibitions

New Works and Their Stories

24 February, 2020 1 comment Leave a comment

 New watercolours by Karen Richardson

Shown above are the three watercolours I completed last month. They form an eclectic group, with each painting having been inspired by a different journey. The trait they share is that I have wanted to paint these subjects for a while, sometimes years, and I finally got around to it this winter.

Frozen Two, watercolour by Karen Richardson

The smallest painting, 'Frozen Two', watercolour on panel (no glass) 6 x 12" is shown above and pictures an ice falls that forms each year near Lake St. Peter, ON. I photographed the icy cliff while snowmobiling several decades ago (photo shown below) and always thought this scene would make a dramatic painting subject.

Photo of Ice Falls by Karen Richardson

I am drawn to the contrast of dark brown rock and light blue icicles, so I enhanced this colour scheme and value contrast in the painting. I added the deer to the picture to give a sense of scale and a spark of life. Shown below is me in my studio working on this piece.

Karen Richardson painting in her studio

Disney's latest cinema blockbuster, Frozen II was playing in theatres during the time I was creating this watercolour. I couldn't resist the play on words when I was searching for a title for this sweet little painting.

Click here for more information about Frozen Two.

My next two pieces are from trips to the East Coast of Canada. 'Reflections of Yesterday', watercolour on panel (no glass) 12 x 16", is shown below.

In the spring of 2017, my husband and I and several friends explored New Brunswick, Nova Scotia, and Prince Edward Island for two months in our travel trailers. I posted three stories showing the highlights of this fantastic trip ('Perfect Prince Edward Island', 'Camping in Beautiful Nova Scotia', and 'Top 5 Must-Have's for Travel Fun').

While exploring the quaint seaside village of Victoria in PEI, I photographed this colourful, weathered shed window from five different angles. The two views shown below are the ones I chose as painting references.

PEI shed window photo by Karen Richardson   PEI shed window photo by Karen Richardson

I liked the colours in the red window trim better in the left hand photo, but I preferred the reflection of the jellybean house in the right hand photo. One of the advantages of being a painter is that I can 'mix-and-match' my references.

Every inch of this painting was pure joy to create, from the cracks in the wood shingles, to the flaking red paint of the trim, to the distorted reflections in the old window glass. I am trying a new brand of watercolour paints this winter. They are made by Sennelier in France and I am very impressed with their clarity and strength of colour. The three pigments I chose (Sennelier Red, Sennelier Yellow Deep, and Phthalocyanine Blue) worked perfectly for this piece.

Click here for more information about Reflections of Yesterday.


The next new painting, 'Yesterday's Dreams', watercolour on panel (no glass) 14 x 11", is shown above. I used the same three paints to create all the colour mixtures for this scene.

Last summer, by husband and I spent three months touring the island of Newfoundland in our travel trailer. You can read about key adventures and see highlights of the trip in these posts: 'Icebergs of Newfoundland', 'Top 14 Vistas of Newfoundland', 'A Whale of a Tale in Newfoundland', and 'Seeing Caribou and Moose in Newfoundland'.

While exploring the back roads of the Bonavista peninsula in northern Newfoundland, we came across this gas pump on its concrete pad, smack in the middle of a field of grass, in the tiny settlement known as Red Cliff (photo below)

Red Cliff Newfoundland, photo by Karen Richardson

The price on the pump was 75 cents a gallon, so it probably made its last sale in the 1970’s, before the metric system was adopted in Canada. Any surrounding buildings were long gone. On the shore beyond, a row of houses and fishing sheds had succumbed to wind and rain. I could imagine a story here about the folk who lived and worked in this beautiful place. I knew this would make a fine painting subject.

The grass was finicky to paint, using many layers of masking fluid and paint to achieve the effect of individual blades of grass. The rusty gas pump was an absolute joy to portray in watercolour. I used a magnifying glass and super fine Micron pens with archival ink to do the lettering on the pump.

Click here for more information (including a close-up photo) about Yesterday's Dreams.

The final new painting to show you today is a commissioned piece titled 'Summer Constellations' watercolour on panel (no glass) 6 x 12". The client had seen an earlier painting I did of this scene, fell in love with it, but was disappointed when it was acquired by another client. The problem was solved by my painting a similar version. The first painting, 'Evening Constellations', (2018) shown below, was the same size.

For more information about Summer Constellations, click here.

That wraps up my latest creations. I hope you have enjoyed this glimpse into how I translate photos from my travels into unique artistic expressions. My hope is that my artwork will welcome viewers like old friends, and draw them into the narrative behind the art. Stay tuned to see what old friends February brings!

If you have comments you wish to share, please do so using the 'Leave a Comment' button at the top of this post. 

Subscribe to Karen's Newsletter if you wish to see more painting stories, travel tales, studio news updates, or notices of upcoming painting classes and exhibitions

Gold Rush Tour: Our Snowmobile Adventure

11 February, 2020 5 comments Leave a comment

Karen Richardson's snowmobiling friends 

This year for our Valentine's anniversary, my husband and I and 4 friends enjoyed a 5-day 800-km Gold Rush Tour of the Timiskaming-Abitibi region by snowmobile. This part of northeastern Ontario lies between North Bay and Cochrane.

Waterfront Inn New Liskeard

Everyone towed snow machines from home and gathered in New Liskeard on the shore of Lake Timiskaming, where we stayed overnight at the Waterfront Inn and parked our trucks and trailers for the duration of our snow adventure. As the photo above shows, we had our machines stationed right outside our patio doors. We had a lovely view of the lake, complete with dozens of fishing huts (some of which are shown below).

Lake Timiskaming

Our first day on the trails we rode from New Liskeard west to Gowganda. The weather was relatively mild and sunny and the trails were well groomed and smooth, so I was able to hold my camera in my bare hands and take a bit of video as we rode along. Usually it is too cold to do this, so it was a rare treat to be able to capture this footage to show you what trail riding is like.

Click on the picture below to view the 2-minute video:

 

We stopped at a trail bridge to take some scenic photos. Shown below is me walking out on the bridge and then a photo of the beautiful view of the frozen river. I think this will make a great painting.

Karen Richardson on snowmobile bridge

Photo by Karen Richardson

In Gowganda we stayed at Auld Reekie Lodge, which was easy to find due to the trail signage, shown below. The Gold Rush Tour had excellent trail markings along the entire route, thanks to the dedicated volunteers who clear the trails and post signs like these every winter.

Snowmobile trail signs Gold Rush Tour

At Auld Reekie, the 6 of us shared a 3-bedroom lakefront cabin (shown below) and enjoyed a delicious pork schnitzel dinner and full breakfast in the main lodge.

Karen Richardson Snowmobile trip Gowganda

The second day we snowmobiled from Gowganda to beyond Gogama. The weather was colder but riding conditions continued to be excellent and the scenery was fantastic.

Photo by Mike Fowler

Photo by Mike Fowler

Occasionally our group stopped on the trail to stretch our legs, bask in the winter wonderland scenery, and enjoy cups of hot chocolate and coffee from our thermoses. We  carried trail food for snacks (such as trail mix, chocolate bars, cheese, water) and equipment for emergencies (saws, tow ropes, first aid kit, space blankets, cell phones, tools, etc). Snowmobile trips are more like safaris than road trips. Below is a photo of my husband and me on our snowmobile at one of our rest stops on the trail.

Karen Richardson and her husband snowmobiling

By late afternoon, we arrived at our next destination, the Tata Chika Pika Lake Lodge, where hosts Henri and Annie gave us a warm welcome. Our rooms in the 6-bedroom sleeping cabin (shown below) were spacious and warm.

Sleeping cabin at TataChikaPika Lake Lodge

Everyone enjoyed drinks and conversation at the bar in the main lodge before dinner (shown below).

Karen Richardson and friends at TataChikaPika Lake Lodge 

The owners had mounted a magnificent 62"-wide moose rack (by comparison, I am 64" tall) above the field stone fireplace, shown below with me and my husband as we shared a laugh.

Karen Richardson with her husband 

That evening we were served an awesome gourmet dinner of pork tenderloin with wild mushroom sauce, roasted organic carrots, twice-baked cheddar potatoes, and an old-fashioned Queen Elizabeth Cake for dessert. Beyond yummy. We had such an enjoyable stay at this lodge that my husband and I want to return in the summer with our travel trailer, to camp at their adjacent campground and do some exploring with our ATV and kayaks.

On the third day we headed for Timmins and stopped on a bridge above rapids at a control dam (shown below). There might be a painting subject or two here...

Photo by Karen Richardson

In Timmins, we stayed at Cedar Meadows Resort and Spa, which we have enjoyed many times in the past. We soaked in their outdoor hot tub and had an excellent chef-prepared dinner in their fine dining room. The 6 of us went on their afternoon elk-feeding wagon ride, which I describe in detail (including video) in my previous post Hand Feeding Elk in Northern Ontario. The photo below shows me feeding Rocky the bull elk, a gorgeous gentle creature.

Karen Richardson feeding elk

On the fourth day we journeyed from Timmins to Kirkland Lake, again with excellent snow conditions. I must mention our memorable lunch stop at the Cosy Diner in Matheson. We had lunches at restaurants four times during our trip, and this one was the best of the best. My husband and I enjoyed home made hot roast turkey sandwiches, fresh cut fries and fresh made creamy coleslaw that were superb. If you ever find yourself going through Matheson, I highly recommend stopping at this diner.

Photo by Karen Richardson

That night we stayed at the luxurious new Microtel Inn which is accessible from the trail in Kirkland Lake, and some of us enjoyed the indoor pool and hot tub before a pizza-delivery dinner.

On day 5, we journeyed from Kirkland Lake back to New Liskeard. Below is a photo of me and my husband on our machine, which has a GPS navigation system, two gas tanks, and room for both of us plus 3 pieces of waterproof luggage. I ride on the very comfortable back seat which, along with my hand grips, helmet visor and underjacket, is heated electrically. Yes I'm spoiled.

Karen Richardson's snowmobile adventure

Quite often during this trip, our route took us along hydro line right-of-ways, which provide convenient corridors through the forest and the opportunity to enjoy riding fast on swooping curves and hills (shown below). Woohoo!

Photo by Karen Richardson

We spent the final night at the Waterfront Inn in New Liskeard and drove home the next day. Our snowmobile adventure this year was easy and fun, and we very much enjoyed the camaraderie of our friends. We feel lucky to live where we easily can access world-class snowmobile trails for winter getaways.

Thank you to our friends Nancy, Rick, and Mike who contributed several of the photos in this article.

One of the excellent side benefits of these winter adventures is that I have access to gorgeous wilderness scenery, to take photos I can use for painting ideas. Shown below are a few of the paintings that resulted from years of snowmobile excursions. Click on the photos for more details about theses pieces.

Frozen Two, watercolour 6 x 12"

Snow and Stone, watercolour by Karen Richardson

Snow and Stone, watercolour 16 x 12"

Winter on Lake Kashwakamak, watercolour by Karen Richardson

Winter on Lake Kashwakamak, watercolour 11 x 14"

February Flow, watercolour by Karen Richardson

February Flow, watercolour 18 x 24"

Cabin in the Snow, watercolour by Karen Richardson

Cabin in the Snow, watercolour 9 x 12"

Wild Wonders - Lynx, watercolour by Karen Richardson

Wild Wonders - Lynx, watercolour 22 x 15"

Fresh-Fallen Snow, watercolour 7 x 10"

February Farm, watercolour by Karen Richardson

February Farm, watercolour 5 x 15"

What do you do to enjoy the outdoors in winter? If you have comments you wish to share, please do so using the 'Leave a Comment' button at the top of this post. 

Subscribe to Karen's Newsletter if you wish to see more painting stories, travel tales, studio news updates, or notices of upcoming painting classes and exhibitions.

The Making of 'Whispering Waters'

25 January, 2020 4 comments Leave a comment

Shown above is 'Whispering Waters' watercolour on panel (no glass), one in a series depicting islands in northern lakes. Everything in this 24 x 18" painting is inspired by my imagination assisted by general reference photos from trips throughout northern Ontario, except for the green cedar-strip canoe, which is shown below in a close-up photo of the painting.

Detail of Whispering Waters watercolour by Karen Richardson

This 16-foot canoe was made by First Nations (Huron) in Wendake, Quebec for Simpsons-Sears. My husband bought it in their store in 1963 and we still own this fine craft. I painted it from life.

Detail of Whispering Waters watercolour by Karen Richardson

Shown above is a close-up photo of the island in the painting. I am thrilled with the mist in the background, which contrasts perfectly with the dark hues of the island and adds a sense of mystery to the scene. The complex reflections were very challenging but turned out even better than I had hoped.

The photo sequence below shows the painting in stages as I created this scene.

Whispering Waters watercolour in progress by Karen Richardson

Step 1 (above) I drew the outline of island, canoe and rocks in pencil on 300-lb cold press bright white Arches watercolour paper. Then I masked the edges of the rocky point of land with masking tape, wet the rest of the paper with clear water, and painted on several mixtures of Prussian Blue, Cobalt Blue Deep and Primary Blue. I used sweeping horizontal strokes with a large brush, to simulate gentle ripples in the water. I used the same blue mixtures for the sky.

Whispering Waters watercolour in progress by Karen Richardson

Step 2 (above) I added two more layers of blue to the water to get the deep colour I wanted, with a full day of drying in between layers, to minimize lifting of older layers when the new layers were applied. Then I removed the masking tape and painted the first layer of greens on the island trees.

Whispering Waters watercolour in progress by Karen Richardson

Step 3 (above) I painted more layers onto the island trees and created their reflections, making sure to place them in the lighter sections of the ripples. All colours in this painting were mixed from the three blues mentioned previously, plus Permanent Yellow Lemon and Primary Red. These paints are all made by Maimeri in Italy and I love the rich, clean colours of these artist quality paints.

Whispering Waters watercolour in progress by Karen Richardson

Step 4 (above) I mixed a neutral gray from three primary colours and painted the far shore on dry paper, adding clear water along the lower edge to look like fog. Once the paper was dry, I painted the straight blue reflection of the sky at the water level of the island. After that dried, I painted the rocks on the island.

Whispering Waters watercolour in progress by Karen Richardson

Step 5 (above) Using masking fluid, I protected the gunwales of the canoe and the paddle on shore. Then I painted three separate layers to create the foreground point. The first was a grisaille (grayish) layer to set up the shadows while I could still see my pencil lines clearly. When that was dry, I wet the whole shore area and painted on several brownish mixtures and sprinkled on salt to create texture in the wash. When that dried I removed the salt and intensified the shadows.

Whispering Waters watercolour in progress by Karen Richardson

Step 6 (above) I painted the canoe exterior and interior, removed the masking, and painted the gunwales and paddle.

Whispering Waters watercolour by Karen Richardson

Step 7 (above) I darkened the shadows throughout the painting to finish 'Whispering Waters' 24 x 18".

Mounting and Framing: Once the paint was fully dry, I mounted the watercolour paper to an archival wood panel, then varnished to provide protection from UV fading, then mounted the panel in a black wood floater frame (shown above).

I am very pleased with how this major work turned out. I feel like it is beckoning me to step into the scene, pick up the paddles, launch the canoe, and spend the day exploring the mysteries of this beautiful northern lake. I hope you feel the same pull to become part of this magical place.

For more details about this painting, click here.

If you have comments you wish to share, please do so using the 'Leave a Comment' button at the top of this post. 

Subscribe to Karen's Newsletter to see more of her painting stories, travel tales, studio news updates, or notices of upcoming painting classes and exhibitions.

The Unbroken Story: Why My Painting is on an Album Cover

11 January, 2020 1 comment Leave a comment

 
Unbroken CD by Terry Posthumous, cover artwork by Karen Richardson

My ‘Unbroken’ image was licensed last year for an album cover (shown above) by Canadian singer/songwriter Terry Posthumus. The long, happy journey of how this happened began about 18 months ago, thanks to Facebook.

The story of this series of events also is an excellent example of how I use Facebook and Instagram to spread awareness of my artwork, which often leads to new homes for my paintings.


Karen Richardson with her stone circle watercolour in progress

In August of 2018. I made a Facebook/Instagram post of the photo above, showing me in my studio holding a painting in progress, with the following caption:

"I started a new watercolour painting this week, based on striped stones from my own collection (note the vases of pebbles on my window sill). I'm so lucky to be able to make art in a beautiful bright studio overlooking a field of corn here in Lindsay, Ontario. Life is good. Cheers to all."

Two days later, I posted these photos with the caption:

Karen Richardson with completed stone circle watercolour   Karen Richardson's completed stone circle watercolour

"Finished today. Watercolour 12 x 12"
I love it! Let me know your suggestions for a great title. So far I like:
The Same But Different
Stone Soul Circle
The Ties That Bind
Eternity Ring"

I had an excellent response from my Facebook friends, and was contacted by someone who wanted to buy the painting. A few days later I responded to my followers:

"I appreciate all the thoughtful title suggestions everyone suggested. I made note of over 30 good ones to use on future paintings. The title I selected for this piece is Circle of Kindred Spirits, which was suggested by the buyer of this painting. I like this title because it is welcoming and symbolic of positive energy, and it refers to a common bond shared by members of a community. Just like all of us on this Facebook post are bound together by art. Cheers to all."

One of the other title ideas I especially liked was 'Unbroken', suggested by one of my watercolour students who follows me on Facebook. I decided to use this title on my next stone circle painting. About a week later, I posted the new work in progress:

Karen Richardson with Unbroken stone circle watercolour in progress

"I have more stone circle watercolour paintings in the works. These are such fun. (OK, I'm a confessed rockaholic.) Here I am in my sunny Lindsay studio, surrounded by my pebble collection - on the window sill, and arranged into circles in the foreground. The painting I am working on is titled 'Unbroken', a title suggested by my Facebook friend Pauline Shortall-Shenton for a previous stone circle painting. I love the red/gray colour scheme in this one. I'll show you when it is finished. Cheers everyone and have a great day."

The next day I posted the finished painting photo and caption:

Karen Richardson with her watercolour painting Unbroken

"Unbroken, watercolour 12 x 12". I finished this painting today, the second piece in my Stone Circle series, inspired by my own collection of pebbles. I love the way Unbroken turned out. The stones are a metaphor for the common bond shared by humanity. We are one."

The post included this close up photo below with the caption:
"Unbroken, watercolour 12 x 12". I love the way it turned out. I used actual pebbles from my collection as reference for this painting. Thanks to Pauline Shortall-Shenton for the title."


Unbroken, watercolour by Karen Richardson

A week later I received a private message through Facebook from Terry Posthumous. I was acquainted with Terry from when I lived in Port Perry and knew he was a musician and guitar instructor. He knew my artwork from when he used to work at Framer's Gallery and make frames for my Doors of Port Perry posters.

"Hello Karen. I would be interested in chatting with you about using your, "Unbroken" painting as the cover for my soon-to-be-released EP entitled, "Catharsis". Are you open to chatting about this? Peace."

I responded in the affirmative and, over the next several months Terry and I discussed, researched and drafted a non-exclusive rights managed license agreement, which was signed in early January 2019.

This type of contract meant I was able to sell the original painting to anyone, and also make and sell print reproductions of the Unbroken image. I had the painting photographed by a professional photographer to make a very high resolution image.

I made this post at the end of January 2019:

Unbroken CD cover held by Terry Posthumus

"I have some amazing news. My painting 'Unbroken' will be on the cover of "Catharsis", Terry Posthumus's new record, which is expected to arrive on March 29, 2019. This is the first time I have licensed an image for the music industry and am thrilled that this well-respected Canadian singer songwriter chose my artwork for his international release.
"Hailing from Oshawa, Ontario, Terry Posthumus is an innovative Canadian artist, activist and speaker. Terry is known for lyrics that are introspective, inspirational and insightful. His gravelly voice and his command of his instrument has captivated audiences near and far - with performances that have been described as “root-sy”, engaging and delightful. His passion for life, love, family, faith and justice is woven into the very fabric of his songs and stories. Through story and song, Terry delivers a powerful message of grace, hope, mercy, peace and love."
'Unbroken' also is available as custom art prints on paper, canvas, wood, metal, and acrylic in a variety of sizes, from my print-on-demand publisher FineArtAmerica."

The album of gospel songs written and performed by Terry was released originally under the 'Catharsis' title, but he liked the title of my painting so much that he quickly changed the album title to 'Unbroken'. Here is the back of the CD package:

Unbroken CD by Terry Posthumus

Then, Terry emailed me with more good news:

"Hi there. Would you be interested in doing a combined Art Show/CD Release concert with me? I would like to introduce you to my world and talk about how this happened. I was thinking the last weekend of March... BTW, I want to buy the original."

Unbroken release concert March 2019

I attended the album release dinner concert party at Nestleton Waters Inn (shown above), made a speech about the origin and symbolism of my Unbroken painting, and had a display of my artwork there.

Part of my speech said: "This painting is the second in my Stone Circle series, inspired by my collection of smooth striped stones. This circle symbolizes unity and the stripes represent the common bond that connects all of us, no matter what colour, size, shape, or orientation we might be. My hope is that the people of this earth focus on what unites us, rather than what divides us."

Terry spoke about how my painting appealed to him as soon as he saw it on Facebook the previous year. He said he had 14 children (11 surviving) and there are 14 stones in my Unbroken painting, so it represented family to him. He loves stones, and the way they each have different shapes, sizes, and colours in the painting made him think of the different passions, personalities, and life paths of his children.The line connecting the stones symbolized his hope to spend eternity with his kids. He also noted how a watercolour painting is constructed in transparent layers, just like he builds the audio tracks on his record, so a picture emerges over time.

It was a wonderful evening of music and stories, presented to a sold out house. Terry gave me a deposit that night after the concert, towards the acquisition of my Unbroken painting.

The album went on to become an unprecedented international success for Terry. In February he posted this about a single from Unbroken called Time and Again:

Time and Again single by Terry Posthumus

In May he posted about another single from the Unbroken album that was being played worldwide:

Mercy single by Terry Poshumus

I am so pleased that my artwork played a small part in the continued success of a fellow Canadian artist. I love it when artists support artists! You can find out more about Terry and listen to his music at www.terryposthumus.com.

Last October, after I returned from our summer exploring Newfoundland, Terry and his wife came to my studio to pick up his painting. Terry mentioned that his Unbroken album had been entered in a national music award competition and he would let me know if he made the short list. Here is a photo his wife took of Terry and me in my studio. Terry is a lovely person - very calm, caring, and kind. He has a big heart to match his tall stature.

Karen Richardson and Terry Posthumus Oct 2019

Terry posted this photo of the painting hung in his Oshawa music studio. I can't think of a more fitting home for this piece of art:

Unbroken painting at Terry Posthumus studio

In November, Terry let me know the fantastic news that his Unbroken album had garnered three official nominations from the Gospel Music Association of Canada. Here is my Facebook post with the details:

"Hello friends

I am honoured and thrilled to let you know that my 'Unbroken' image was licensed earlier this year for an album cover by Canadian singer/songwriter Terry Posthumus, and the album is now one of five nominees for 'Album Artwork Design Of The Year' in the 41st Annual Covenant Awards, presented by the Gospel Music Association of Canada.

Terry's 'Unbroken' album also has been nominated for 'Country / Southern Gospel Album Of The Year' and his single 'Time and Again' has been nominated for 'Country / Southern Gospel Song Of The Year'.

Congratulations Terry on this landmark achievement and I hope you win all three awards. Thank you for the opportunity to showcase my artwork to an international audience.

Pinch me, somebody...😁🍁❤️👍"

Gospel Music Assoc nomination for Unbroken album artwork

Winners will be announced at the 41st annual Covenant Awards at Trinity Western University in Langley, BC in March. I will let you know what happens.

And that is the story of how one of my Stone Circle paintings became an album cover. That reminds me, I have more stone circles to paint!

Click here for details about art prints of Karen's Unbroken image.

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Meet My Fall Grads

26 December, 2019 0 comments Leave a comment

Karen Richardson Watercolour Class

This fall, during ten watercolour workshops held at my Lindsay studio, at Meta4 Gallery in Port Perry, and at Colborne Street Gallery in Fenelon Falls, I had the pleasure of guiding 60 students on their painting journeys.

I pack a lot of learning into every class I teach, and enjoy working with students who are keen to absorb and put into practice all the techniques and advice I share with them while we paint together. My students produced some amazing paintings, and I learned some new things along the way too. Below is a photo of me demonstrating a 2-brush technique.

Karen Richardson Demonstrating Watercolour

My most popular workshops teach beginners how to paint smooth beach pebbles. This is a great subject for people without much (or any) art experience, because smooth stones are very easy to draw and the colours don't have to be accurate. As with all my classes, I show how to mix colours for a painting using only the three primary pigments red, blue, and yellow. Pictured below are the graduating students from my 'Pebbles' workshops.

Karen Richardson with her watercolour students

 

Karen Richardson watercolour students

 

Karen Richardson watercolour students

 

Karen Richardson watercolour students

Another popular class subject was 'Island Reflections', taught as a 2-day beginner workshop, once in my studio and once at Colborne Street Gallery. Each student made his or her own unique interpretation based on a reference photo. Shown below is a photo of students working on their paintings in my studio, followed by the graduation photos.

Karen Richardson studio workshop
 

 

Students in Karen Richardson's studio workshop

 

Karen Richardson watercolour workshop

'Misty Lake and Canoe' was a popular class for intermediate level students, held in my Lindsay studio and again at Meta4 Gallery. We worked from multiple reference photos so each student could compose a unique, imaginary scene. Shown below are the graduating students proudly displaying their paintings.

Karen Richardson watercolour workshop

Students in Karen Richardson watercolour class

I taught a 'Rocky Shore' 2-day class again this year, as it was so popular last fall that I had a full waiting list. Shown below are students working on their paintings in my studio, and then the graduation photo.

Karen Richardson watercolour class

Karen Richardson watercolour class

I taught a three-day 'Driftwood Beach' workshop for intermediate/advanced students, that produced amazing results. We all used similar reference photos of the beach and added our own version of driftwood. This scene was a very challenging subject to paint and everyone had fun while learning new skills. Pictured below are my students working on their paintings in my studio, and the graduation photo. 

Karen Richardson watercolour class

Karen Richardson watercolour class

Thank you to all my students, who made a watercolour journey with me this fall. I felt like I learned some things along the way, and I think my students felt the same. It is great to spend time with keen painters.

My next watercolour workshops (1-day, 2-day, or 3-day) will run from mid October to the end of November, 2020.

Subscribe to Karen's Newsletter if you wish to see more painting tips, travel tales, studio news updates, or notices of upcoming painting classes and exhibitions.

November New Works and Their Stories

08 December, 2019 1 comment Leave a comment

Watercolour paintings by Karen Richardson

Teaching fall watercolour classes to almost 60 students kept me very busy in November, so I was delighted to somehow fit in the completion of seven beautiful new paintings last month (pictured above).

The two larger pieces I finished were very satisfying, as they represented a considerable investment of time and expertise to complete. The first one, 'Lapping Waters', watercolour on panel (no glass) 16 x 20" is from my Lake Superior series and is shown below.

I love the glow of light on the water and wet beach, and the contrast of vivid blue water against the warm hues of the sand. This was a technically difficult painting, with each section requiring multiple layers of paint to smooth out the gentle colour gradations.

This beach is at Neys Provincial Park on the north shore near Marathon, ON. The Little Pic river flows into Lake Superior here, depositing sand and driftwood onto an extensive beach. This is a popular spot for family holidays during the summer, as the sand bottom extends several hundred feet out into the lake, making for safe swimming conditions. Here is the reference photo I worked with to make the painting.

Lapping Waters, watercolour by Karen Richardson

Years ago, logs were floated down the Little Pic River each spring, gathered into booms, and towed to the pulp mill at Marathon. The driftwood in this scene serves as a reminder of the logging history of this place.

Click here to see more details about 'Lapping Waters'.

The second large painting completed last month is from my Northern Lakes series. 'Peaceful Passage', watercolour on panel (no glass) 16 x 20", is shown below.

I love creating the effect of fog and mist with watercolour. It has taken me years of practice to learn how to paint misty backgrounds effectively. I like the contrast of clear, strong colours in a dramatic foreground against a backdrop of misty, pale gray. I enjoy the sense of mystery that fog brings to a painting, as if it were inviting the viewer to create the narrative behind the scene.

This imaginary composition of islands in a northern lake was derived from a couple of my reference photos taken at Lake Muskoka and Lake Superior, and a canoe photo I obtained from a friend. Shown below are the landscape references.

Photos by Karen Richardson

Click here to see more details about Peaceful Passage.

Continuing with my Northern Lakes series is 'Hidden Secrets', watercolour on panel (no glass) 12 x 12", shown below.

I think this is one of my most successful fog scenes so far. I am captivated by the drama of the dark silhouettes of the island trees emerging from veils of fog. I love the luminosity of the mist and the soft reflections in the lake.

I obtained the reference photo for this painting from a Facebook acquaintance, who gave me permission to make a painting from her photo, which is shown below. She said the location is Loon Lake, north of Huntsville, ON.

Photo by Judy Feskun

Click here to learn more details about Hidden Secrets.

The next new piece in my Northern Lakes series is 'Just Breathe', watercolour on panel (no glass) 16 x 12", shown below.

This is another imaginary scene, but the feel of this place is so real that I want to go there. I love the way the majestic pines dominate the vertical composition and lead the viewer's eye to the canoe resting on the rocky shore. The foggy background adds contrast and mystery to the scene, and we wonder why the paddler stopped here. I like the way the autumn foliage echoes the warm hues of the canoe.

I used two reference photos of trees (shown below) to compose this painting, both from the Temagami region of northern Ontario.

Photos by Karen Richardson 

Click here to see more information about Just Breathe.

The next painting 'One Last Cast', watercolour on panel (no glass) 8 x 8" was a commissioned piece for a client and is shown below.

One Last Cast, watercolour by Karen Richardson 

The client wanted a painting similar to a previous piece of mine that was titled 'Last Cast', but asked if I could include the client's own boat and dog in the scene and change the colour scheme from pink to orange. The previous painting and new photo references are shown below.

   Photos by client

The final two paintings from November were inspired by our trips to Newfoundland. The first piece 'Classic Rock', watercolour on panel (no glass) 12 x 6" is shown below.

This pebble and boulder beach is in Gros Morne National Park on the west coast of Newfoundland and is a scene I have painted many times. Classic rocks like these just never get old! Here are some previous versions I painted of this beautiful spot.

Shipwreck Point, watercolour by Karen Richardson   Newfoundland Beach Rocks, watercolour by Karen Richardson   Saltwater and Stone, watercolour by Karen Richardson

Click here to see more details about Classic Rock.

The second new painting inspired by Newfoundland is in my StoneGarden series and shows a Monarch butterfly resting on smooth beach pebbles. This piece is titled 'Sacred Spirits', watercolour on panel (no glass) 12 x 12" and is shown below.

When researching the title for this painting, I discovered that some people believe butterflies represent the spirit world, and sighting a Monarch butterfly means your guardian angels are guiding and protecting you.

I photographed the reference butterfly in the Insectatorium in Deer Lake, and the stones were inspired by pebble beaches in Gros Morne National Park. Both of these places are on the west coast of Newfoundland.

Click here to find out more details about Sacred Spirit.

That wraps up my November creations. I hope you have enjoyed this glimpse into how I translate photos from my travels into unique artistic expressions. My hope is that my artwork will welcome viewers like old friends, and draw them into the narrative behind the art. Stay tuned to see what old friends December brings!

If you have comments you wish to share, please do so using the 'Leave a Comment' button at the top of this post. 

Subscribe to Karen's Newsletter if you wish to see more painting stories, travel tales, studio news updates, or notices of upcoming painting classes and exhibitions.

October New Works and Their Stories

05 November, 2019 2 comments Leave a comment

Discovery Awaits, watercolour by Karen Richardson

It is remarkable how many memories can be captured in a simple lake scene. I grew up in the Canadian Shield region of Ontario, just east of Algonquin Park, so landscapes filled with clear water, sturdy rocks and wind-sculpted pine trees are ingrained in my soul.

October was a very productive month in my studio, ushering in seven small paintings as I continued working on my Northern Lakes series and my Pebble Beach series. You can click on the pictures to see more details about them.

Shown above is 'Discovery Awaits', watercolour on panel (no glass) 10 x 10". This was inspired by a photo taken by my long time friend Tim Thorington at Rock Lake in Algonquin Park. His photo reminds me of my childhood and is pictured below.

Photo of Rock Lake, Algonquin Park, by Tim Thorington

I inserted different foreground trees and a canoe into the scene. I feel many elements of this painting turned out exactly right: the curving line of the beach that beckons the viewer into the scene, the glow of light on the water, the unusual cloud patterns that lead the eye to the sculpted pine trees, the warm and inviting colour scheme and, above all, the sense of place.

Click here for more information about Discovery Awaits.

 

The Edge of Time, watercolour by Karen Richardson 

Shown above is 'The Edge of Time', watercolour on panel (no glass) 8 x 8".  This painting was inspired by the photo below that I took at Lake of the Woods in 2012.

Lake of the Woods, photo by Karen Richardson

My husband and I visit this beautiful part of northwestern Ontario every chance we get. The lake's colour, pine trees, and rocky islands are particularly beautiful to me, as they remind me of the Ottawa Valley where I spent my childhood.

In the painting, I invented a golden misty background to give the impression of a dawn or near-sunset scene. The title refers to the cusp of day and night.

Click here for more details of The Edge of Time.

 

In This Moment, watercolour by Karen Richardson 

Shown above is 'In This Moment', watercolour on panel (no glass) 11 x 14". I used the photo below as reference for this island lake scene. I took the photo decades ago while canoeing on a northern Ontario lake.

Photo of northern Ontario lake by Karen Richardson

This is the second time I have painted this scene. The first watercolour, titled 'At Rest' was smaller (8 x 10"), painted a year ago, and shown below.

At Rest, watercolour by Karen Richardson

I am so captivated by this wee island mirrored in a serene lake that I can see more paintings like this in my future. Perhaps an autumn version...

Click here for more details about 'In This Moment'.

 

Perfect Fit, watercolour by Karen Richardson

Shown above is the first of October's pebble beach paintings. This one is titled 'Perfect Fit', watercolour on panel (no glass) 8 x 8" and it depicts a cluster of beautiful specimen stones nestled in crevices between smooth boulders. Each pebble is uniquely lovely and comfortable in its surroundings, just like a gathering of old, dear friends. This piece is entirely from my imagination, loosely inspired by blue pebbles I have seen in British Columbia.

Click here for more details about 'Perfect Fit'.

 

Settled In, watercolour by Karen Richardson 

Pictured above is a companion painting to 'Perfect Fit'. This one is titled 'Settled In', watercolour on panel (no glass) 8 x 8" and depicts another blue-themed collection of stunning stones, both large and small, created from my imagination.

Click here for more details about 'Settled In'.

 

Land of the Blue Jay, watercolour by Karen Richardson

Pictured above is an 8 x 8" watercolour I painted a few years ago titled 'Land of the Blue Jay'. I loved this wee piece and I have a small collection of blue jay feathers which have been gifted to me by friends or by happenstance over the years, so I decided to paint a few more pebble beach backdrops for these iconic blue feathers.

 

Featherstone Finery, watercolour by Karen Richardson

Shown above is 'Featherstone Finery', watercolour on panel (no glass) 8 x 10". The pebbles are imaginary but loosely inspired by the gloriously warm-toned pebble beaches of Gros Morne National Park in Newfoundland. Featherstone was the name of the very first pebble and feather painting I ever made, almost 20 years ago.

Click here to see more details about 'Featherstone Finery'.

 

Light as a Feather, watercolour by Karen Richardson

This final piece from the October collection, shown above, is 'Light as a Feather', watercolour on panel (no glass) 6 x 12". It also is inspired by Gros Morne beaches in Newfoundland. I love the contrast of the orange and blue colour scheme.

Click here for more details about 'Light as a Feather'.

It feels great to be back in the swing of painting this fall. Stay tuned for November's creations.

If you have comments you wish to share, please do so using the 'Leave a Comment' button at the top of this post. 

Subscribe to Karen's Newsletter if you wish to see more painting stories, travel tales, studio news updates, or notices of upcoming painting classes and exhibitions.